Some notable individuals...

Collaborators

The fish dudes of Toronto at a wedding for the fifth amigo (Nathan Lujan)
The fish dudes of Toronto at a wedding for the fifth amigo (Nathan Lujan)
Dr. Lovejoy
Dr. Lovejoy

Nathan R. Lovejoy

 Needler Netter & PhD advisor

- fish systematics and molecular phylogenetics

 

Dr. Grubbs
Dr. Grubbs

R. Dean Grubbs

 Shark-Whisperer & MSc primary advisor

- fisheries science, abyssal fish ecology & ichthyology

 

Dr. Erickson
Dr. Erickson

Gregory M. Erickson

 Dino-guru & MSc co-advisor

- archosaur evolutionary morphology

 

 

Dr. Huber
Dr. Huber

Daniel R. Huber

 Undergrad whipper-into-shaper & BSc advisor

- functional morphology & skeletal biomechanics

 

 

 

Dr. Summers
Dr. Summers

Adam P. Summers

Self-proclaimed 'Fish Guy' & Postdoctoral advisor

evolutionary morphology & biomechanics of fishes

 

Dr. Lopez-Fernandez
Dr. Lopez-Fernandez

Hernán López-Fernández

Curatorial Maestro

- Neotropical fish evolution, ecomorphology, conservation & systematics 

Dr. Welch
Dr. Welch

Lisa B. Whitenack

 

Geometric morphometrics, Finite Element Modeling (FEM), Tooth form & function

https://sites.google.com/a/allegheny.edu/whitenack/lisa-s-research

Christine Bedore


Batoid sensory biology, behavioral ecology & physiology

http://www.bedorebatoid.com/

Devin Bloom

 

Fish systematics, molecular systematics & trait evolution

 https://devinbloom.wordpress.com/

Stephanie Crofts - paleontology, biomechanical modeling, tooth structure & function

https://croftss.wordpress.com/

Mason Dean - morphology, skeletal biomechanics, and biomaterials

http://www.mpikg.mpg.de/dean

Phil Motta - functional morphology, feeding biomechanics in elasmobranch fishes

 http://shell.cas.usf.edu/motta/

Kristene Parsons


Gymnura expert, batoid life history, & fisheries ecology

Sarah Steele

 

Neotropical fish systematics, body size evolution & morphology, conservation

Donald Taphorn


Neotropical fish systematics, ecology, and conservation

My students (and what they're supposed to be doing)...

Amy & Ereny, respectively
Amy & Ereny, respectively

Amy & Ereny Botross (2015-2016)

Amy and Ereny are considering a future in the medical sciences, perhaps dentistry?  So it should come as no surprise that they are tackling a project investigating the evolutionary dynamics of mechanical function in stingray jaws. Specifically they are using geometric morphometric techniques to identify if jaw shape diversity is predictive of functional disparity in jaw mechanics... They will also be determining if various cranial skeletal components evolve as a concerted module or if rates of shape change are de-coupled between jaws, skull, and hyomandibular elements.

Swara Shah (2014-2016)

Swara was one of my top UTSC Human Anatomy students and is applying to med school this year.  She has an interest in muscle physiology and histology.  Swara is helping with a project that examines the use of biological pulleys in the mouths of stingrays and how these rays use these bony protuberances to increase force generation during biting.  Swara is also learning how to stain muscle muscle tissue for ATPase activity - this project is investigating the distribution of muscle types across embryological cranial muscle groups in different elasmobranch fishes.

Henil Patel (2014-2015)

Henil was also one of my anatomy students last fall.  He has an interest in whole-muscle function and biomechanical modeling.  Henil is dissecting bat rays and cownose rays collected from commercial fisheries in order to contrast the scaling patterns of feeding performance in rhinopterine vs myliobatine stingrays.  Henil is using a three-dimensional, static equilibrium model developed by Dr. Daniel Huber to estimate bite forces in these stingrays which estimates the moments (torques) acting on the lower jaw.

 

Mike on an expedition to Costa Rica
Mike on an expedition to Costa Rica

Michael Dobrovetsky (2012-2014)

Mike has worked with me for two years, after surviving a fish collection trip to the Caribbean Coast of Costa Rica. His directed study research is on body shape evolution in anchovies and other clupeomorphs in collaboration with Dr. Devin Bloom (Univ of Western Michigan).  Mike has as a fascination with birds and is an avid birder, but his professional scientific interests include community ecology, neotropical biodiversity, and the role of zoos in conservation.